Meet Our Resident Otters

Meet Our Resident Otters

Unfortunately not all otters that we rescue can be released back into the wild, due to a variety of reasons. These vary from disabilities to imprinting on humans. We currently have 3 otters living that are permanent residents with us in our rescue centre. Read their stories below.

The otters that live with us permanently live in specially designed enclosures that create an enriching environment that is as naturalistic as possible. They are provided with enrichment to keep them entertained. You can buy our otters gifts from our Amazon Wish List or donate money to help with their care.

Reggie

3-year-old Reggie has joined us from the Tamar Otter Centre, which has very sadly closed its doors. He was found emaciated and seriously injured from a suspected dog attack, and has shown some neurological struggles, so will stay with us forever. We will completely spoil this gentle otter and give him a special enrichment program to help him settle in!

Tolga

When Tolga was rescued he had a wound from a possible otter attack and an ulcerated eye, which both cleared up while he was with South Essex Wildlife Hospital. He then moved to us in December 2021.

He is now a permanent resident at our rehabilitation centre as he has imprinted on humans/ became humanised due to the extent of his injuries which meant he required several surgeries where had to be sedated and along that line he became used to human presence, so it would be dangerous for him to be released back into the wild.
Every step was taken so he wouldn’t be but sometimes it happens with no one at fault, he will now become an Ambassador for the UK Wild Otter Trust and raise awareness for his species.

Rolo

Rolo was found curled up in the middle of the road in Budleigh Salterton, by a lady on a horse in April 2022. We called her Rolo because she rolls upside down to sleep.

We believe she was found as a cub by a member of public and kept as a pet as she is very tame, has a well groomed coat and has trimmed nails. We don’t think she had any access to water to play or swim in as she’s very nervous of it, but hopefully with time she’ll learn to love it, like a normal otter.

We tried to de-humanise her but it didn’t work so she is now a permanent resident at our rehabilitation centre as it would be dangerous for her to be released back into the wild. She will now become an Ambassador for the UK Wild Otter Trust and raise awareness for her species.

Interested in adopting an otter, or staying up-to-date on our activity?